diary

Diarly Redux

Last fall I wrote about a journaling app called Diarly. The developer has continued to add regular, incremental improvements and refinements. The most significant, I think, is that you can now export to PDF.

You still can’t print from Diarly, but since you can export an entire journal or individual entries as PDF files, you can print from Preview easily enough.

Another nice (far from unique) feature, which I mentioned in passing in the previous look at Diarly: You can review your word count over various time periods (ranging from the past week to the past 12 months) in all journals or journal by journal. You can also check the word count of the entry you’re currently working in. Nothing revolutionary in this, but a handy feature.

You can track your writing output in Diarly.

In the review I indicated that I was going to be using Diarly as my journal, but I have been using MacJournal for a variety of reasons. But I would be happy to use Diarly. It is a lovely app that does one thing, and does it well.

The main prompt for this follow-up is that the developer of Diarly gave me a few Promotion Codes to give out to my blog readers. I have them for iOS and Mac. Shoot me an email to request a set. (I’ll post an update when they are gone.)

Advertisements

MacJournal concatenated text demonstration

As a follow-up to my recent review of MacJournal, I wanted to show another nice feature of the writing application. You can select individual entries (use the Command Key to select them, or the Shift Key to select a block of entries) and view them one after the other in the editor window. The screencast above shows how this looks (using some excerpts from Mary Austin’s The Land of Little Rain).

You can also export the selected documents as one document.

This isn’t a revolutionary feature. Ulysses and Scrivener do this as well, and probably better. But it is a nice touch that I didn’t mention in the review.

The screencast also demonstrates the hover over feature I mentioned in the review. When you bring your mouse over an entry in the list, a popup shows details about the entry as well as a text preview.

Diarly — an excellent markdown journal

Diarly is a recent addition to the diary/journal app competition.

Diarly is a journaling app that uses markdown to format its entries. Released earlier this year, the initial version was attractive but felt far from complete. Steady improvements since then have turned Diarly into a more realistic option for taking daily notes. With the recent addition of an iOS companion app, Diarly takes a big step forward in the competition for useful journaling software. 

The basic version of Diarly is free. You can unlock premium features by purchasing the Pro upgrade, which, at the time of this writing, is $10.99  for the MacOS app and $4.99 for the iPad app. You will need to upgrade in order to sync your journals across devices.

Here’s what the developer says about Diarly:

Beautiful, Safe and Secure – Diarly is designed so that you can focus on journaling. Pure in it’s form, powerful in it’s functions.

Here are my thoughts:

Dedicated to journaling

Diarly is a dedicated journaling app. It automatically creates a new entry for the date you open it. You can only create one entry per day per journal (more on journals below). There is no add button, although you can use the calendar to navigate to a different date, which creates an entry for that date if you haven’t already created one. 

Use the pop up calendar to navigate to existing entries, or to create new ones, past or future.

Multiple journals

You can have multiple journals to record different aspects of you life and responsibilities (you get the multiple journal feature when you buy the Pro version). Switching between journals is quick and easy, just select the journal you want from either of the two drop down menus — one is at the top of the editing panel, the other at the top of the entry list panel. Or select the journal from the Journals menu.

Entry List Sidebar

In the sidebar you can filter your list of entries. View all entries, starred entries (favorites), entries with photos, or select from a list of hashtags. You can add hashtags to any entry the same why you’d add a hashtag to a tweet.

Live search narrows the list of entries as you type the search string. And the app highlights the word or phrase in the text of the qualifying entries.

Markdown

Diarly uses standard markdown syntax. There is no preview view. After you enter the markdown characters, they generally get out of the way, similar to the way Bear works. Bear describes this approach as “rich previews while writing so you see prose, not code.” 

Security

You can set Diarly to encrypt your entries with password access. I believe this works universally with all your journals and entries, and can’t be set on a journal or entry level. 

Templates

If you like structured journal entries, Diarly allows you to build a custom template for each journal. It comes with one in place for the Diary journal with three headings:

  • Events
  • Accomplishments
  • Activities

You can edit or add a template to any of your journals using the preference dialog.

You can modify this however you please. The template becomes the default for new entries. You can have a different template for each journal.

Update: The developer has informed me that the new default template has just two headings:

  • What did I do?
  • What did I learn?

Inline images

You can drag images right into the editor to place them where you like. Embedded images, however, are not encrypted with the text.

This nifty dialog allows you to adjust the type size, the font and the line length. You can also select from one of four themes (with the Pro version), and create your own themes.

Other nice features

  • Modify themes if you understand CSS
  • Word and character count
  • Set word goals
  • Import DayOne and MacJournal entries (I haven’t tested this)
  • Word and character counts, and writing goals

iPad app

The iPad app is nicely designed and has so far sync’d flawlessly. There is not yet an iPhone app, but that is next on the developer’s list.

Suggestions for Improvement

  • I’d like additional built-in theme options, with the ability to apply them individually to the different journals. That way I would have an instant visual cue to remind me which journal is open at any one time.
  • Diarly needs more options for exporting text. Right now you can only export as a markdown file.
  • There is no way to print from within Diarly. There is a Print item in the File Menu, but it is grayed out. I learned from the developer that he is likely to add printing, especially if people request it. The same is true of PDF export.

The Bottom Line

Since it will be natural to see this review falling into the same category as my review of markdown note-takers, I need to make it clear that Diarly is not a substitue for a dedicated note-taking app. It is a daily journal. As such it is very well designed and feels natural and inviting to use. Fire it up and an entry is waiting for you to begin recording your daily thoughts and activities.

I like Diarly enough to adopt it for my daily journal, trusting that its few shortcomings will be corrected in future releases. If you’re comfortable with a one-entry per day approach to journaling, Diarly might be a great choice for you, too.