Tinderbox screencast tutorial four

It took almost a month to get this to the point that it was even somewhat publishable. In this episode we expand on our Day Planner, which we started in episode 3. We see how to set up an agent to hunt for completed tasks and place a check mark badge on the note. We look briefly at “display expressions” so we can see due dates in our notes on the map, and how to format the dates so we don’t see times. And we create a dashboard agent with a summary table to get an overview of our appointments.

Tinderbox 6 Tutorial 4 from Stephen Zeoli on Vimeo.

A lovely and inspiring video featuring Tinderbox

Dominique Renauld creates wonderful Tinderbox videos. They aren’t tutorials so much as they are inspirations. They show you what Tinderbox can help you do, not the nuts and bolts of how to handle Tinderbox. But they are well worth seeing, both for the spark they may provide in tackling Tinderbox and for their shear beauty.

In the most recent video, he shows some of the great features of the outline view. Watch it here:

Tinderbox screencast number 2 — stamps and agents

I’ve uploaded the second of my Tinderbox 6 tutorial videos. This one might be a little — just a little — bit more polished than the first. In this episode I provide a quick introduction to Stamps and Agents. Stamps allow you to set an action to be applied to a number of selected notes simultaneously. Agents are notes that look for other notes that match a specific criteria and then apply some action to them automatically. Agents work continually, search for any new notes or changes to work upon, while Stamps are used manually by the user. Hopefully you will see what I mean if you watch the video. Here it is:

Introduction to Tinderbox 6 – Part 2 from Stephen Zeoli on Vimeo.

Star Trek Beyond leaves the Enterprise in smoldering ruins

The Enterprise is left a smoldering ruin in the first 20 minutes of Star Trek Beyond... and so is the Star Trek franchise.

The Enterprise is left a smoldering ruin in the first 20 minutes of Star Trek Beyond… and so is the Star Trek franchise.

Amy and I watched the latest Star Trek film tonight on disk from Netflix. I can say that this is easily the worst Star Trek film ever. It may be one of the worst big budget films ever. That the Enterprise is completely destroyed in the first 20 minutes serves as the perfect metaphor for what J.J. Abrams is doing to this franchise: turning it into smoking ruins. Abrams directed and wrote (I think) the first two of the reboot films, and executive produced this one. The first film was good. The actors really pulled off the difficult task of stepping into the roles of such iconic characters. Abrams appeared to understand that Star Trek is first and foremost about those characters and their relationships. The second film continued to honor the characters, but it lost its footing with an implausible story and a really, really bad grasp of physics. But it is Citizen Kane compared with this new film, which fails in every area: Ridiculous plot. Absurd “science.” Plot written to serve the special effects. Special effects that aren’t very special (how can they be when the film is wall to wall effects?). And, worst of all, the actors begin to look like frauds pretending to be Spock, Kirk, Bones, Scotty, because the writers just don’t care about them as characters any more.

Here are some random gripes about this travesty:

  • The filmmakers rush from one outlandish and impossible stunt to another, conjuring up whatever pseudo-science they need to explain why they can do this, usually with a quick one-sentence explanation from Scotty. “He’s using the gravity slip stream…”
  • How the villain and his crew end up doing what they are doing makes no sense whatsoever. How they get the amazing technology to destroy star ships when they are stranded on a planet is gasp inducing, and not in a good way. That they even know about a super weapon that comes into possession of the Enterprise is unlikely at best. Why the villain keeps the crew of the Enterprise alive, when he’s intended to destroy millions of people is inexplicable, except to the extent that the writers needed them alive so Kirk, et. al. can rescue them.
  • How is it that the Enterprise is on a five-year mission to explore unknown space, but there is a giant Federation space station with millions of people on it at what they describe as the edge of the frontier?
  • It takes the crew longer to fly from one edge of this space station to the center than it did to fly from a distant planet within a nebula.
  • Seeing that nostalgic music worked for Guardians of the Galaxy, the filmmakers boldly incorporate that idea into this story. But the music sucks.
  • The writers dutifully make Scotty and Bones say things that Scotty and Bones are known for saying… i.e. “I’m a doctor not a…” and “Captain, I’m giving her all she’s got…” (or something close). But that’s no substitute for actually making these living, breathing characters.
  • Why there is a vintage motorcycle onboard a deep space, early star ship that has crash landed on the planet on which Kirk and crew are stranded is a head scratcher, but you know immediately that Kirk is going to ride it at some point. And when he did, I just felt another round of “lets create the stunts first, then we can shove a plot in there to fill in the cracks.”

I love Star Trek and these characters, but someone has got to rescue them from J. J. Abrams. Steven Spielberg, where are you when we need you?

My first Tinderbox video tutorial

Huzzah! After thinking about this a long time, I’ve finally made my first Tinderbox Tutorial. As you’ll see, it is a little rough around the edges as I get used to the features of Screenflow. And I’m no James Earle Jones with the voice over. But I hope this video can help novice Tinderbox users and those thinking about becoming novice Tinderbox users get a sense of the very basics of the program. I hope to be adding more videos in the future, ones more polished and which expose more of Tinderbox’s great features.

UPDATE: The first version of this video had some editing errors in it. I’ve fixed those.

Introduction to Tinderbox 6 from Stephen Zeoli on Vimeo.

Tinderbox Labor Day Sale – save $50

This just in (from an email from Eastgate Systems):

This weekend only, Tinderbox is on sale. Save $50, and get started on that big push. Whether you’re writing a thesis or a novel, planning a new product, running a campaign, or planning your big trip, Tinderbox will help you get the most from your research.
Tinderbox is the tool for notes if you’re working on a Mac.

Flowstate. The writing app that feels like a monster creeping up on you

Just for the heck of it, I decided to purchase Flowstate, the writing app that forces you to keep writing for a specified time or all the work you’ve done to that point disappears. Permanently. I’ve decided to let the results of my first writing session serve as a review for Flowstate. The review starts below the screen capture.

Screen Shot 2016-08-16 at 9.48.22 AM

Okay, so I am trying Flowstate, the writing app that forces you to keep writing or you lose all the writing you’ve done during that session to the point you quit.

Does this make sense?

I can see the rationale. Whether or not it works for me is the question.

So here I am. Writing.

Writing is an important aspect of my life. But I don’t do enough of it. If Flowstate helps me write more, then the $10 I spent for it will be worth it.

I’m not sure yet how you get your writing OUT of Flowstate and into another writing app for editing. I guess I’ll find that out at the end, assuming I don’t wind up losing all this text.

Another question is whether free flow of text is really a productive approach for me. Maybe I’ll be able to judge that after I see what I’ve produced here. It is really nerve wracking to see the text start to fade away when I stop writing for even a second or two. All my text will simply go away if I stop for five seconds. It feels like one of those horror movies where the protagonist knows that the monster is creeping up behind her. Don’t turn around!!!

So I’m continuing to write. I set this initial session for 10 minutes. I’ve been writing for six, so far. Still four minutes to go.

When you start Flowstate, you are presented with a simple screen. You can adjust how long you must write and what font to use.

If your brain gets stuck, you can just hold down one key for a while then hold down the delete key. Flowstate interprets this as writing. It’s a hack. I haven’t done this yet, but I think it will work.

Having this app is like having a Nazi SS officer demanding that you reveal where you’ve hidden the classic artwork.

I am going to publish this as my review of Flowstate on my blog and you can judge for yourself if the result was worth anything… Twenty seconds to go. I think I’m going to make it… just keep writing… and now….


So there you have it. I’m going to keep using Flowstate for a while and see if the results get better. By the way, you can simply export the results of your writing session as a text file. There are also ways to push it to other apps, like email and notes. I’ve added Curiota as an option for exporting, which basically makes it available on any device I have through Dropbox.

Scrivener for iOS has arrived

It was a long, grueling haul for Literature & Latte founder and programmer Keith Blunt, but for those of us drooling over the thought of Scrivener for iOS the wait has been worth it. In spades.

This will not be a review of the iOS Scrivener. The app is so feature rich that it would take way too long. Also, Keith has done such a great job highlighting the app’s functionality on the L&L blog that a review would just be redundant.

No, this is merely an acknowledgment of the wonderful work done by Keith and his crew. I’m still working my way through the tutorial and testing out features, but I feel confident saying Scrivener is the most well-thought-out and executed software making the leap from OSx to iOS that I’ve ever used. (Ulysses is up there too.)

IMG_0385

Not every feature of the Mac app has made the leap. For now, at least, the binder also serves as the outliner. Good enough for an overview of structure, but without the extensive display of meta-data the Mac app’s outline view supplies. But for version 1.0 this is a remarkably mature app, and is a testament to Keith’s pursuit of excellence with Scrivener.

Make no mistake. Scrivener for iOS is a powerhouse writing environment independent of its OSx sibling. Congratulations to Keith and the rest of the Literature & Latte team.